Recidivism Insurance

moultanomoultano Creator of ns_shiva. Join Date: 2002-12-14 Member: 10806Members, NS1 Playtester, Contributor, Constellation, NS2 Playtester, Squad Five Blue, Reinforced - Shadow, WC 2013 - Gold, NS2 Community Developer, Pistachionauts Posts: 4,219 Advanced user
edited July 2004 in Discussions
A business idea
  • More than two million men and women are behind bars in the United States.
  • 70% of released prisoners are back in jail within 5 years.
  • It is nearly impossible to find gainful employment with a significant criminal record.
There is clearly a problem with the criminal justice system. The US incarcerates a larger percentage of its population than any other country in the world. People argue back and forth about harsh punishments vs. rehabilitation, etc. But no one has come up with a good way to get past the fact that ex-cons can't get jobs. When you can't get a job, you are more likely to become a criminal, and thus the process repeats.

Consider a business that offers the following: People newly released from jail will be given the option of paying a small monthly fee to a recidivism insurance company. In exchange for which, the insurance company would agree to assume liability for any damages that result from hiring the person.

Do you think this would be viable as a business, and do you think it would provide a significant benefit to society? Discuss.

(optional addition: prisoners released on good behavior could have their monthly payments subsidized by the government.)

Comments

  • HandmanHandman Join Date: 2003-04-05 Member: 15224Members Posts: 277
    Sounds good to me. It does suck that criminals cannot get jobs when released. I can understand some people's reluctance when it comes to hiring a violent offender though. The fee would have to be a nominal one at first, like 10 to 20 dollars a month.
    user posted image
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  • ThansalThansal The New Scum Join Date: 2002-08-22 Member: 1215Members, Constellation Posts: 10,571 Advanced user
    posibly a good idea

    the one posible problem would be the same reason why Bail Bond company's are almost nonexistant now.

    If you screw up, you don't get punished (what are they gona do? Toss me in the pen for not paying my bail bond after I skiped out on Bail?)


    On top of that there is still the typical aversion that people have to criminals (no amount of $$ can make up for what hapens if he decides to attack me).

    So though it seems like a posible idea, there could be alot of problems with it.

    Also, where do the excons get the $$ to pay for this service any way?
    <Eternaly_Lost> Me and lolfighter are lovers
  • anonanon Join Date: 2004-07-27 Member: 30183Members Posts: 14
    QUOTE (Thansal @ Jul 28 2004, 11:52 AM)
    Also, where do the excons get the $$ to pay for this service any way?

    Its withheld from their paychecks.
  • CMEastCMEast Join Date: 2002-05-19 Member: 632Members Posts: 1,655
    the problem is that while its good in theory they will still only get low paid jobs, now remove a proportion of their monthly wage because they are criminals (which is what it boils down too) and they may feel like its hopeless getting a job.

    It's bad enough as it is. I know two people who were advised to sign on and claim benefits instead of working because they actually had more money from benefits than they did from working, it would be even worse for those who had to pay this recidivists insurance.

    Still I approve overall, something needs to be done to those who have spent time in a jail still employable.
    user posted image
  • moultanomoultano Creator of ns_shiva. Join Date: 2002-12-14 Member: 10806Members, NS1 Playtester, Contributor, Constellation, NS2 Playtester, Squad Five Blue, Reinforced - Shadow, WC 2013 - Gold, NS2 Community Developer, Pistachionauts Posts: 4,219 Advanced user
    For a lot of people I'm sure that's true, and I think we need overall better job training programs to make up for that. But I know there are some highly skilled people who get out of jail, and then can't find a job that uses their skills. There's one guy my mom's boyfriend knew who was working as an independent contractor. The company was looking to promote him to an internal position, but when they were looking into his background they found that he had a criminal record. As a result, not only could he not work for them directly, but he couldn't even contract with them as an outside agent anymore. This is the type of thing I would like to eliminate.

    It would also be interesting to find out if something like this would allow ex-cons to get much better jobs than they otherwise would have. Any managers out there on the boards care to comment?
  • reasareasa Join Date: 2002-11-10 Member: 8010Members, Constellation Posts: 2,367
    edited July 2004
    Well I own an a cat and I feel that entitles me to a say

    Certainly some people are unhireable, but your idea is a pretty damn good one I think.
    But I really don't think that's the best solution to our prison overcrowdings. I think we need to remove certain laws that are not preventing a crime, and becoming nothing more then a burden to the tax payers. I'm talking about drug laws, which have done nothing to prevent drug use what so ever.
    I don't like, support, or use drugs, but even I can see the pointlessness of trying to keep that sham of a law running any longer.

    If people want to get the stuff they will find a way.
    Stop arresting people for drug use and watch prison numbers drop drastically.
    If they still want to go after the dealers that’s fine, save it for the big fish.
    Arresting drug users in mass, which my town does ALL the time, does nothing to stop the problem and simply becomes a burden on the system.

    But I guess thats a bit off topic.
  • ZelZel Join Date: 2003-01-27 Member: 12861Members Posts: 1,610
    if we dont trust an ex-con to work anywhere, how is that different from the death penalty?
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  • ekentekent Join Date: 2002-11-08 Member: 7801Members Posts: 781
    QUOTE (Zel @ Jul 29 2004, 08:32 AM)
    if we dont trust an ex-con to work anywhere, how is that different from the death penalty?

    Well I'm no genius but I think with one of those you kill people.
    The care of human life and happiness, and not their destruction, is the first and only object of good government.
    - Thomas Jefferson
  • AlkillerAlkiller Join Date: 2004-05-23 Member: 28847Members Posts: 1,124
    QUOTE ((e)kent @ Jul 29 2004, 11:34 AM)
    QUOTE (Zel @ Jul 29 2004, 08:32 AM)
    if we dont trust an ex-con to work anywhere, how is that different from the death penalty?

    Well I'm no genius but I think with one of those you kill people.

    I think he's trying to say that if they don't have a job they don't have a life anyway... it's valid but there are those ethical issues...
    image
  • CMEastCMEast Join Date: 2002-05-19 Member: 632Members Posts: 1,655
    I know plenty of criminals and they are jolly nice chaps.

    I wouldn't necessarily hire them all even though I do trust them, it's just that quite a few of them don't have a work ethic or a sense of responsibilty. Good people at a party but not in the office next door.
    user posted image
  • GunFodderGunFodder Join Date: 2004-02-15 Member: 26572Members Posts: 146
    I think it really depends upon the crime. If it were drug possesion or minor robbery or assault, etc., they should be given a better chance at a new start as their case was probably some unfortunate mistake or poor judgement...they are crimes people can learn from. However, rapists and people guilty of manslaughter, attempted murder and murder I just can't feel any sympathy for. They have committed acts that are so outside the realm of normal ethical and civilized behavior, I'd be hard pressed to believe they can rehab and become productive members of society.
  • ThansalThansal The New Scum Join Date: 2002-08-22 Member: 1215Members, Constellation Posts: 10,571 Advanced user
    Well, as my cowrker is an ExCon
    he was in for attempted murder, and he also used to be a drug dealer.

    Now he works as a stock clerk. Nice guy, as hard working as the rest of the slackers that work there. He also no longer sells drugs, as he knows it is just a bad idea.

    So yes, any one can change.

    As for the Recidivism Insurance
    What every one is forgetting is that there is a good chance that a private company probably couldn't do this, and if it is done by the govn't then that will be even more $$ down the drain.

    Remember, this is insurance. The amount of damage that could be done by a not-so-Ex-Con in a workplace is ALOT. This means that the company doing this would have to beable to make enugh $$ (via investments), off of the minimal amount of $$ that these ExCons pay them, to be able to pay out rather heafty claims.

    As I am NOT an actuary, I can't tell you if this is a problem or not. However, I am guessing it is. Remember, medical insurance is a few hundred a month (more then you can likely pay with a minimum wage job).
    <Eternaly_Lost> Me and lolfighter are lovers
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